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How to Start the Workers’ Compensation Process in South Carolina

05-14-2019
charleston workers' compensation lawyer

How to Start the Workers’ Compensation Process in South Carolina

Most employers must carry workers’ compensation insurance, so if you are injured on the job in South Carolina, you can get workers’ compensation benefits. However, you must follow certain procedures and meet deadlines, or your claim could be denied.

You must give notice of the injury to your employer. You have up to 90 days, but you should give notice as soon as possible to your supervisor.

Once you report an injury, your employer has 10 days to report the injury to the South Carolina Workers’ Compensation Commission (Commission). Your employer should ask you to fill out paperwork and submit the claim to its insurance carrier. The employer chooses what doctor you see and pays your medical expenses.

If your employer does not file the claim, you can file a Form 50 with the Commission detailing how your injury happened.

You usually have two years from the time of the injury to file a claim. If you suffer a cumulative or repetitive injury, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, you have two years from the time you discover or should discover the injury to file a claim. If you suffer an occupational disease, the time for filing a claim begins to run when a doctor diagnoses your condition.

If your employer contests your claim, you can request a hearing before the Commission. One of the commissioners will hear your case. If you are not satisfied with the commissioner’s decision, you may request a review by a panel of three commissioners. If you are still dissatisfied, you may appeal to the South Carolina Court of Appeals.

If you suffer an on-the-job injury, call a workers’ compensation lawyer at Steinberg Law Firm 24/7 at 843-720-2800, make an appointment at www.steinberglawfirm.com, or visit our offices in Charleston, Goose Creek or Summerville. The initial consultation is free.

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